Otto

Soft White Winter Wheat

Otto is a soft white common wheat developed and released in 2011 by the Agricultural Research Center of Washington State University. Otto was named in honor of Otto Amen, a former state representative, WSU alumnus, and wheat producer who established an endowment to fund dryland wheat research in Washington. Otto provides a combination of excellent yield potential and excellent disease resistance in dryland winter wheat production areas of the inland Pacific Northwest. Otto is best adapted to regions of Washington, Idaho, and Oregon where Eltan, Bruehl, and Xerpha are currently grown.

Agronomics

Yield Potential is Excellent

Protein is Good

Test Weight is Similar to Eltan

Maturity is Equal to Eltan

Height is Equal to Eltan

Quality is Desirable

Disease Resistance

Stripe Rust is Excellent

Strawbreaker Foot Rot is Similar to Madsen

Snow Mold is Equal to Eltan

Bred to Dominate the Field

Five-Year Variety Testing Data 2013 – 2017

C.V.%

LSD (0.05)

9

1

8

3

2

0.2

6

0.1

Variety
*club
<12″ Yield (BU/A) 12″-16″ Yield (BU/A) Test Weight (LBS/BU) Protein (%)
Otto 51 88 59.6 11.4
Puma 48 95 60.0 11.3
Xerpha 53 99 59.7 10.8
Eltan 50 89 60.0 10.7
Masami 49 92 58.9 10.9
Mela CL+ 52 86 60.3 10.9
Curiosity CL+ 52 88 60.4 10.8
Bruehl* 49 92 58.5 11.2
AR-Crescent* 48 93 59.2 10.9

<12″ Precip (Connell, Harrington, Horse Heaven, Lind, Ritzville, St. Andrews) 2013–2017, 24 loc/years

12″–16″ Precip (Almira, Anatone, Creston, Lamont) 2013–2017, (Reardan) 2015–2017, 25 loc/years


Availability

Foundation seed of Otto is maintained by the Washington State Crop Improvement Association. For variety inquiries please contact Washington Genetics or (509) 659-4020. U.S. Plant Variety Protection status for Otto was issued in 2014.

View WSU Variety Otto in pdf format (pdf).

Dryland Wheat Areas <14″ Annual Precipitation

Dryland Wheat Areas with less than 14" of annual precipitation in the Pacific Northwest.


Support for the development of this variety was provided by Washington State University, the USDA, and the Washington Grain Commission. For more information please visit WSU Small Grains.

Washington State University