WSU CAHNRS

CAHNRS and WSU Extension

Wheat and Small Grains

Nematode Diseases

Click on the images below to view more information on each disease:
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Cereal Cyst Nematodes

Nematode Publications

Cereal Cyst Nematode Life Cycle

Cereal Cyst Nematodes – 2016 (PNW620)

Abstract: Nematodes are tiny but complex unsegmented roundworms that are anatomically differentiated for feeding, digestion, locomotion, and reproduction. These small animals occur worldwide in all environments. Most species are beneficial to agriculture. They make important contributions to organic matter decomposition and the food chain. Some species, however, are parasitic to plants or animals. One type of plant-parasitic nematode forms cysts that contain eggs from which juvenile nematodes hatch to damage and reduce yields of many agriculturally important crops.

Cereal Cyst Nematodes – 2010 (PNW620)

Abstract: Nematodes are tiny but complex unsegmented roundworms that are anatomically differentiated for feeding, digestion, locomotion, and reproduction. These small animals occur worldwide in all environments. Most species are beneficial to agriculture. They make important contributions to organic matter decomposition and the food chain. Some species, however, are parasitic to plants or animals. One type of plant-parasitic nematode forms egg-bearing cysts on roots, damaging and reducing yields of many agriculturally important crops.

Nematode Presentation Visuals – Smiley

Root Lesion Nematodes in Wheat (MT200801AG)

Root Lesion NematodeAbstract: Root lesion nematodes are microscopic roundworms that parasitize agricultural crops in every part of the world. Two species of root lesion nematode, Pratylenchus thornei and Pratylenchus neglectus, are damaging to wheat. Our neighboring states of Washington, Oregon and Idaho experience annual yield losses in spring wheat due to infestations of both nematode species. Studies in Oregon and Washington have attributed up to 36 percent yield reduction in intolerant cultivars due to P. neglectus. Greatest losses occur in low-rainfall, annually cropped wheat. A survey of small grain fields in Montana for root lesion nematode was conducted in 2006 and 2007. The assessment showed damaging populations of P. neglectus occurring in north central counties of Montana, in fields of winter wheat and fields managed as no-till. No P. thornei was detected in the state. Trials conducted in summer 2007 reveal that McNeal and Outlook spring wheat display tolerance (by maintaining yield) in the presence of damaging P. neglectus populations.

Video: Nematode Biology, Symptoms, and Management in Small Grain Crops

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