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Jasper, WSU’s 100th Released Variety

In 2015, WSU released a new soft white winter wheat cultivar named Jasper, which was the 100th cultivar released from the University.  Unfortunately, in the 2016 WSU Variety Testing trial, Jasper was not included due to a seed error in transferring the seed from the breeding program to the variety testing program.

Table 1. Agronomic characteristics of Jasper compared to check cultivars in WSU Wheat Breeding trials
BU/A HD PH
Jasper 89.5 149 34
Xerpha 80 151 34
Eltan 75 152 35
Bruehl 79 153 36
Puma 82.5 149 36
Otto 85 153 36

As a result, many growers have asked for yield information on this line from the test plots in the breeding program, where the correct seed was planted.  Tables are provided to help summarize the performance of Jasper as compared to other cultivars released from the breeding program.  These lines are also included as check cultivars in my yield trials, and thus provide easy yield comparison.

Table 1 provides information on heading date (HD; days after January 1st to heading) and plant height (PH; measured in inches).  The yield data encompasses all paired location data we have on Jasper across 74 locations and seven years.  Yield of Jasper is significantly higher than all other cultivars when averaged over these locations.

Table 2 provides the data just in locations receiving less than 16” of annual rainfall.  Here there are 49 paired observations for yield comparison.  Jasper again demonstrated higher yield potential than check cultivars.  Data is also presented in Table 2 representing specific locations where we have multiple observations of Jasper across years.  Again, yield potential is higher than check cultivars with the exception of Lind.

 

Table 2. Grain yield potential of Jasper compared to check cultivars in WSU Breeding and Variety testing trials receiving less than 16” of annual rainfall

Davenport (4) Harrington (5) Lind (12) Ritzville (5) Breeding Trial Average (49) Variety Testing Average (34)
Jasper 103 75.8 50 69 73 71
Xerpha 99 73.2 53 64 67 72
Eltan 90 64.4 48 59 63 68
Bruehl 88 69.2 48 58 64.5 65
Puma 92 71 48 67 67 67
Otto 88 70.4 51.5 68 67.5 66

When data is averaged from the <16” WSU Variety Testing trials where Jasper was present (2013-2015, 34 observations), Jasper had a significantly higher yield potential than all checks except Xerpha, which showed no significant difference.  In 2016, Jasper was also on two large scale plantings.  In Ritzville, a large strip trial had Jasper averaging 77 bushels per acre (bu/a), the highest yield of all entries.  Xerpha yielded 61 bu/a, whereas Puma and Otto both yielded 74 bu/a.  At the Wilke Farm in Davenport, Aaron Esser had a field of Jasper and a field of an Otto/Masami blend.  Jasper averaged 99 bu/a, whereas the Otto/Masami blend averaged 91 bu/a.

Average grain yield in bushels per acre over all paired locations in WSU Winter Wheat Breeding Trials in areas with less than 15” annual rainfall.  Variety Testing data is also included, averaging yield data from 2013-2015 in less than 16” rainfall zones.  Individual locations are also presented along with the number of observations analyzed.

Photo courtesy of Paul Porter with Washington Genetics
Photo courtesy of Paul Porter at Washington Genetics
jasper-field-2
Photo courtesy of Aaron Esser
Photo courtesy of Mike Miller with Washington Genetics
Photo courtesy of Marci Miller at Washington Genetics

For questions, contact Arron Carter at ahcarter@wsu.edu or (509) 335-6198.

Washington State University